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IHAVEANIDEA.ORG > articles >  Diary of a Copywriter: Account People from Heaven


Diary of a Copywriter: Account People from Heaven

Posted on July 8, 2011 and read 3,469 times

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lindsay Diary of a Copywriter: Account People from HeavenLindsay Smith
Writer
sometimesicing.com

 

She stared deep into my eyes, reached her arms around me and whispered into my ear “I love you.”

Followed by “thank you for being such an amazing and efficient writer.”

Account people. They can be your worst enemy or your best friend.

The ones that aren’t good at their job make me crazy. I really can’t stand inefficiency. It makes me want to kick people in the shin. Account people who ask me to “work my magic” and create headlines in 12 minutes usually results in a lot of whining about 14-page briefs or impossible character counts or my hangnail. Whatever I can think of to just be miserable to work with. Copywriting is not magic. It’s a result of hard work and multiple Facebook status updates while churning out headlines.

If you’re just going to forward me the 179 slide Power Point presentation from your client filled with expressions like “horizontal cooperation” and “brand symbiosis” instead of actually answering my question, you can pretty much guarantee your project is going at the end of my to-do list. I’m allergic to Power Point. And Excel spreadsheets. That shit gives me hives. I deal with email and Microsoft Word. And that’s it. Suivant, next.

But the good account people? They’re like the Swedish Berries of the ad world. I don’t even know what the metaphor means. But it sounds delicious.

I mean, my account person was right. I am an amazing and efficient writer. Let’s call a spade a spade. Or call a talented and funny and beautiful and well-dressed writer a talented and funny and beautiful and well-dressed writer. As the case may be.

And maybe she was just trying to graze my boob with the impromptu hug. But she’s so good at her job, I’d totally let her to it for free. In fact, she’s so efficient and helpful, I’d probably let her give me a tattoo of her face. On my face. I love her that much.

Oh, what a breeze to work on a project when your account person is two steps ahead of you the whole way. Clear brief? BOOM. Realistic timeline? BOOM. Hand delivers a Jack and Coke to your office on a Friday afternoon? BOOM.

That last one might be above and beyond, but my account person has actually done it for me. That’s how much love we’ve got going on here. She asks the right questions and always has the right answers. And more importantly? She never, ever asks me to “tweak”, “re-massage” or “jazz-up” my copy. And that’s someone whose back I’ll have from here until the end of time.





  • http://twitter.com/Dee_rop Dee Rop

    In my 7 years and 4 agencies of advertising existence, I have NEVER experienced a “good” account person. This story is a myth-they don’t exist!

  • Adil Nazarali

    Here’s a possible solution to terrible account people:

    Freelance! Just you, the blank word document flashing cursor, and on the other side of the world, a lucky client.

  • http://www.sometimesicing.com/ Lindsay

    Love it. I want to be a freelancer when I grow up. 

  • http://www.sometimesicing.com/ Lindsay

    Nope. True story. It’s a real person. 

  • Anonymous

    It is not simple as that, clients could be more sleepyheads than some accounts, and worst, they have the final word. So not having an account makes you had to play this rule instead.

  • Anonymous

    Well, this is another prove that no matter how smartass and creative is a copywriter or an art director, an equally smart, liable and eloquent account will be required. In other wordm there is no such a thing as self-selling idea.

  • Tofan Witjaksono

    I have seen for almost 10 years, that when these creative people who were doing freelancing side jobs, suddenly they became very “accommodating” people to work with (“oh do you want the logo to be bigger? no problem, i’ll do it in a bit, just how big do you want it to be?”). Whereas these very same people will bitch as fuck when it came to their regular jobs at the agency (“what do you mean you want the logo to be bigger? it will ruin the layout and you should tell your client to understand the art perspective”). Funny how cash can change these creative people’s behavior in a flash.


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